Design

Small Wonder: Neighborhood Concept Blooms in Bamboo Grove

Lisa Martin wrote a wonderful story in the Crozet Gazette about the little neighborhood we’re trying to build and how it came to be.

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Green Building March 10th Luncheon: Leadership Panel

Hear from founders in the Charlottesville sustainability movement in this dynamic panel discussion. Panelists will share their experiences with careers in green building and sustainability, as well as advice for future generations. Come be inspired by local leaders and gain insights on building sustainability into your work and personal endeavors. This is the first in a series of thought leadership presentations across Virginia in 2020.

Our Charlottesville panelists include:

  • Bob Crowell, 2RW
  • Susan Elliott, City of Charlottesville
  • Annette Osso, Resilient Virginia
  • Galen Staengl, Staengl Engineering

Lunch will be provided

This presentation is approved for I GBCI CE credit

Fee: $10 for members and $20 for nonmembers.

Lunch will be served, Register Here

Our meeting space is generously donated by the City of Charlottesville.

DATE AND TIME
Tue, March 10th, 2020: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EDT
LOCATION
City Space, 100 5th Street NE, Downtown Mall, Charlottesville, Virginia 22902
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Bamboo Grove Crozet Neighborhood Meeting

Thank you so much to everyone who came to the first neighborhood meeting on February 12th for our little Bamboo Grove pocket neighborhood! Your encouragement and great questions made it an educational and fun experience. I wish that we had more time to talk, but as always if you have any other questions or comments please contact us.

Here are the presentation slides that framed our discussion:

CCAC Presentation Slides

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Bamboo Grove Pocket Neighborhood

Bamboo Grove is a miniature neighborhood with six compact, affordable and energy efficient houses is designed for an acre of land a few blocks from downtown Crozet. Shared green space between the houses anchors the neighboorhood together while walking trails and sidewalks connect it to nature and the surrounding community. Common landscaped areas, patio, bicycle parking and mail area will be located between the vehicles and the houses to encourage the informal interaction so essential to build a feeling of belonging to a community.

This type of housing is often referred to as a “Cottage Court”, “Bungalow Court”, or “Pocket Neighborhood” and provides a housing choice that is desirable, affordable and very rare in the current housing stock. All the houses will have a compact design which will help them fit in well with the surrounding neighborhood and will make them more affordable than almost every new house being constructed in the surrounding Crozet area.

The area next to the stream running through the property will be dedicated for Public use as a part of the proposed future greenway trail system that is shown in the Crozet Master Plan.

Rain gardens, native surface landscaping and other green infrastructure techniques will be used as much as possible to manage stormwater from hard surfaces on the site and from the areas draining through it. The site lies next to a small stream, so careful design will be used to filter and slow down the water travelling through the site as much as possible with tools that work with the existing environmental features. The existing topography will be respected and used to enhance the character of the neighborhood. For more details go to the project page:

Charlottesville Tomorrow did a little article on our little project!

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Green Building December 10th Building Tour: First Passive House in Virginia: Ten years in

Tour the first Passive House in Virginia with the General Contractor and Owner as they explain the intentions going into the project and lessons learned. Lankford Passive House has three bedrooms, two-and-a-half bathrooms, and about 2,250 square feet.

The green home has triple-pane Serious Windows 725 Series, double-stud wall framing, FSC-certified framing lumber and plywood, structural insulated sheathing with taped seams, a hybrid wall with nine inches of Agribalance open cell spray foam and cellulose insulation, a roof with Agribalance open cell spray foam and two inches of closed cell roof foam, a white roof, and an exterior with stucco and Western Red Cedar.

The home includes several other green elements, including a 1,100-gallon rainwater harvesting system, locally-sourced slate, regionally-sourced red oak floors with a water-based low-VOC finish, and building finishes from cherry and locust trees harvested on the site.

I GBCI and AIA CE credit pending approval

Fee: $5 for members and $15 for nonmembers.

Register Here

DATE AND TIME
Tue, December 10th, 2019: 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT
LOCATION
229 Lankford Ave, Charlottesville, VA 22902
Categories: Announcements, Architecture, Design, Education, Energy Efficiency, Preservation, Technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Putting a friendly face on Gentle Density

Attached housing is a really smart way to increase density and provide affordable, small housing in walkable neighborhoods, but it is illegal in most places. Duplexes don’t have to be ugly! This is a gallery of lovely examples where attached housing not only fit well into an existing neighborhood, but is also really attractive. Help normalize and re-legalize missing middle housing by adding your pictures to and sharing galleries like these!

Put a Friendly Face on Gentle Density

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Green Building April 9th Luncheon: Regeneration through Design and Collective Action

This presentation will feature core projects at a variety of scales that highlight how communities have worked collectively to increase their environmental resilience and economic prosperity, regenerate landscapes through ecological design, and to create an innovative local home. The presenters will highlight their work at multiple scales with public and private clients where they have developed consensus, engaged in design and developed ecological design plans for urban, rural and community sites that foster increased self-reliance, resilience, beauty and regeneration.

Speakers:

Christine Gyovai is the Principal of Dialogue + Design Associates, a small, woman-owned business based in Charlottesville, Virginia founded in 2005. Dialogue + Design is a multi-disciplinary, public-interest design firm that focuses on helping citizens, localities and organizations build a stronger future through collaboration, architecture, environmental design and community planning. She holds certificates in charrette systems, mediation and permaculture design, with a focus on increasing community resilience and environmental sustainability. She is a member of the National Roster of Environmental Dispute Resolution and Consensus Building Professionals. Ms. Gyovai consults and lectures regionally about permaculture with the Blue Ridge Permaculture Network. She holds a M.U.E.P. in Urban and Environmental Planning from the University of Virginia and a B.S. in Environmental Studies from Burlington College. She lives at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains with her husband and two young children. Additional information about Dialogue + Design is available at our website: www.dialogueanddesign.com

Reed Muehlman is a registered Architect and environmental designer based in Charlottesville, Virginia. Mr. Muehlman is a LEED Accredited Professional, and holds certification from the National Charrette Institute, and in permaculture design and urbanism. He has over twelve years of experience working in the architecture field, and has consulted on several diverse project types including academic master plans, residential visioning and permaculture design, and dairy design. He holds Masters degrees in Architecture and Urban and Environmental Planning from the University of Virginia, and Bachelor’s degrees in Art and Architecture from the Rhode Island School of Design. Mr. Muehlman designed the passive solar straw bale house he and his wife live in with their two children near Charlottesville, Virginia.

This course will be approved for 1 GBCI LEED Specific and AIA CE

Fee: $10 for members and $20 for nonmembers.

Lunch will be served, Register Here

Our meeting space is generously donated by the City of Charlottesville.

DATE AND TIME
Tue, April 9, 2019: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EDT
LOCATION
City Space, 100 5th Street NE, Downtown Mall, Charlottesville, Virginia 22902
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Green Building March 12th Luncheon: Electrify Everything – the Why and the How, from a Residential Perspective

Electrify Everything! Electrification of equipment and devices that currently run on fossil fuels, and then powering those new electrical devices with renewable or zero-carbon electricity, is one of the pillars of de-carbonization, according to most climate and energy policy experts. However, the need for electrification is poorly understood by the general public, most lawmakers, as well as most building design + construction practitioners. John Semmelhack will dive into the details of the why and the how of electrification with a focus on residential buildings (space heating, water heating and cooking), and will examine the implications for residential building electrification for Virginians and our electrical grids.

Speaker:

John is the owner of Think Little, a home performance consulting firm based in Charlottesville, Virginia, specializing in building enclosure and mechanical system design for single-family and multi-family Passive House and net-zero energy homes in the mid-Atlantic.

Since 2007, Think Little has provided consulting, testing and inspection services for over 3,000 multi-family and single-family housing units, including several firsts – the first certified Passive House residence in Virginia as well as some of the first EarthCraft certified net-zero homes.

John is a certified Home Energy Rating System (HERS) rater and an EarthCraft Technical Advisor. John is also a CPHC® (Certified Passive House Consultant), is a member of the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS) Technical Committee, and is a PHIUS Trainer for the CPHC (Certified Passive House Consultant) training program.

This course will be approved for 1 GBCI LEED Specific and AIA CE

Fee: $10 for members and $20 for nonmembers.

Lunch will be served, Register Here

Our meeting space is generously donated by the City of Charlottesville.

DATE AND TIME
Tue, March 12, 2019: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EDT
LOCATION
City Space, 100 5th Street NE, Downtown Mall, Charlottesville, Virginia 22902
Categories: Announcements, Design, Education, Energy Efficiency, Technology | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Green Building February 12th Luncheon: Evolution Glass: Social Impact Design with Recycled Glass

Consumer and industrial waste remain a significant source of economic loss in our community affecting our overall well-being and the health of our ecosystems. Over 8 million tons of glass end up in the landfill

l each year: enough glass to fill more than 6 Empire State Buildings! Only a small portion of glass is actually recycled (around 30%). Founded in 2015 by Bill Hess, Evolution Glass (www.evolutionglassglobal.com) is a social impact business and product that raises awareness about high value opportunities for recycled glass. Using 100% recycled glass packaging (bottles, jars, etc.) and an innovative process, award- winning, internationally recognized, beautiful and unique solid glass surfaces for countertops, tables and other uses are created. The surfaces are powerful, both visually and functionally and serve as an exceptional and notable addition to any living space. The company has completed over 30 installations locally and regionally, including a 60 sq. ft. kitchen near Chicago. Through these projects, an important and positive impact on the way people understand waste glass has been made. In addition to Evolution Glass surfaces, numerous other options remain for waste glass to be reused locally in the form of tile, gravel, and cement, and these avenues are largely neglected. This business is poised to have an even broader positive impact on how people reconsider waste locally, regionally, and globally.

Speaker:

Bill Hess is an award-winning designer, engineer, and entrepreneur living in the Charlottesville area. He has been working with recycled glass for over ten years and making art for over two decades. His work has been featured locally and internationally. After many years of research and testing, he conceived Evolution Glass as a social impact business to transform glass waste into beautiful and inspiring products and art. Bill has expertise in all areas of product development from research and prototyping through full-scale manufacturing in consumer, medical and industrial applications. He also works as the Director of Design Innovation at the Center for Advanced Biomanufacturing at the University of Virginia.

This course will be approved for 1 GBCI LEED Specific and AIA CE

Fee: $10 for members and $20 for nonmembers.

Lunch will be served, Register Here

Our meeting space is generously donated by the City of Charlottesville.

DATE AND TIME
Tue, February 12, 2019: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EDT
LOCATION
City Space, 100 5th Street NE, Downtown Mall, Charlottesville, Virginia 22902
Categories: Announcements, Design, Education, Recycling, Technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Required Reading: Walkable City

Written in an entertaining style, Jeff Speck’s Walkable City brings urban planning concepts to a place that anyone can understand. This book takes the concepts of Jane Jacobs’ The Death and Life of Great American Cities and draws upon loads of independent research to show how street design directly affects a place. You don’t have to be a designer to understand this book, which makes it a great introduction to the way that your city works (or doesn’t) for citizens and planners alike. Everyone should feel like their city gets better every day, and this books gives you the tools to understand some of the interconnected concepts of making a livable and vibrant city or town.

Categories: Architecture, Communities, Design, New Urbanism | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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