Preservation

Green Building December 10th Building Tour: First Passive House in Virginia: Ten years in

Tour the first Passive House in Virginia with the General Contractor and Owner as they explain the intentions going into the project and lessons learned. Lankford Passive House has three bedrooms, two-and-a-half bathrooms, and about 2,250 square feet.

The green home has triple-pane Serious Windows 725 Series, double-stud wall framing, FSC-certified framing lumber and plywood, structural insulated sheathing with taped seams, a hybrid wall with nine inches of Agribalance open cell spray foam and cellulose insulation, a roof with Agribalance open cell spray foam and two inches of closed cell roof foam, a white roof, and an exterior with stucco and Western Red Cedar.

The home includes several other green elements, including a 1,100-gallon rainwater harvesting system, locally-sourced slate, regionally-sourced red oak floors with a water-based low-VOC finish, and building finishes from cherry and locust trees harvested on the site.

I GBCI and AIA CE credit pending approval

Fee: $5 for members and $15 for nonmembers.

Register Here

DATE AND TIME
Tue, December 10th, 2019: 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT
LOCATION
229 Lankford Ave, Charlottesville, VA 22902
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Green Building November 12th Building Tour: A Closer Look at UVA’s Clark Hall

Clark Hall is a mixed-use academic building that opened in 1932 to house the UVA School of Law, and currently houses the University’s Department of Environmental Sciences and Charles L. Brown Science & Engineering Library. It is home to classrooms, office space, a library, a café, laboratories, exhibits, lecture halls and a “wet lab.” Recently, the UVA Facilities Management energy conservation team (Delta Force) implemented a combination of energy and water conservation upgrades, converting all 5,000 interior and exterior fixtures from fluorescent lamps to LED, installing low-flow toilets and faucet aerators, recalibrating air handling units, and upgrading HVAC controls. As a result, Clark Hall achieved an annual energy savings of $750,000, or 65%, along with an annual water savings of $22,000, or 79%, relative to their pre-retrofit baseline. The Delta Force team also documented the sustainable operations of Clark Hall, and the U.S. Green Building Council awarded Clark Hall its “LEED V4 Existing Buildings, Operations + Maintenance Silver” certification, the first such project recognized in Virginia

Speakers and Tour Guides:

Doug Livingston – Doug is part of the energy engineering team and helps identify and implement energy efficiency and retro-commissioning projects across Grounds. He also works with various stakeholders on Grounds to improve the built environment in order to increase health and wellness for the UVA community. Prior to joining UVA, Doug was the Program Manager of the Green Building Services department at Harvard University. Previous to Harvard he worked as a consultant doing HVAC and plumbing design, energy modeling, and energy conservation. He has a Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in architectural engineering from the University of Nebraska and he is a licensed mechanical engineer in the state of California.

Jesse Warren – Jesse is responsible for the University’s electric demand response and sustainable building programs. He leads a team of energy engineers who identify and implement energy efficiency and Delta Force retro-commissioning projects across Grounds. Previously, Jesse worked as a consultant doing energy conservation, HVAC design, energy modeling, and LEED project coordination. He has a Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering from Virginia Tech and he is a licensed mechanical engineer in the state of Virginia. He is a proud father of three and a rain or shine two-wheeled commuter.

John Jones – John joined UVA in October 2010 after holding previous roles in the areas of facilities project management, physical plant operations, and mechanical and building automation systems contracting with various Virginia-based firms. He is currently responsible for evaluating, identifying and implementing energy reduction projects in existing university facilities at UVA. A few of his projects have included Gilmer Hall, Thornton Hall, West Complex and others. John holds a Bachelor of Science in engineering from Old Dominion University and is a licensed engineer in Virginia. He is also an accredited LEED AP BD+C and O+M as well as a Certified Energy Manager. Outside of work, John enjoys outdoor activities and music.

I GBCI and AIA CE credit pending approval

Fee: $5 for members and $15 for nonmembers.

Register Here

DATE AND TIME
Tue, November 12th, 2019: 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT
LOCATION
University of Virginia, Clark Hall, 291 McCormick Rd, Charlottesville, VA 22904
Categories: Announcements, Education, Energy Efficiency, Preservation, Technology | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Green Building July 10th Luncheon: Rotunda at University of Virginia Tour

The Rotunda designed by Thomas Jefferson as the architectural and academic heart of the University’s community of scholars was completed in 1826. The extensive Rotunda renovation, which took from 2012 to 2016, included replacing the domed roof and the exterior column capitals, installing all new interior systems and refurbishing the Dome Room. Three new classrooms and additional study space were developed to encourage students to spend more time in the iconic core of the University. The challenge for this renovation came from meeting modern environmental standards while maintaining the historical integrity of the structure

The University received LEED-NC v2009 Silver certification for the Rotunda renovation project.

“The demolition was carefully managed to minimize the amount of material that was removed, and all of the waste was directed to a recycling service so that more than 95 percent of the materials that were removed from the building were recycled,” Brian Hogg, senior historic preservation planner, said. “The heating, cooling and plumbing systems were designed to be very efficient, and the HVAC has much greater ability to control the rooms for comfort. All of the lights in the building are LED, so in the Dome Room, for instance, the wattage needed to light the dome well is now about 25 percent of what was needed before the renovation. The paints, adhesives and sealants all included low volatile organic compounds.” Source: UVA Today, January 22, 2018, UVA’S VENERABLE ROTUNDA TAKES THE LEED by Matt Kelly

Led by Brian Hogg, Senior Historic Preservation Planner for the Office of the Architect for the University. Brian, the tour will guide visitors through details of the renovation and restoration of the Rotunda.

This course will be approved for 1 GBCI and AIA CEs

Due to space limitations this tour is for USGBC community members only. Register Here

The tour will begin on the south side of the Rotunda on the Lawn. Parking will be available at the Central Grounds Garage off Emmet Street.

DATE AND TIME
Tue, July 10, 2018: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EDT
LOCATION
University of Virginia Rotunda, 1826 University Ave. Charlottesville, Virginia 22904
Categories: Announcements, Architecture, Design, Education, Energy Efficiency, Preservation | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Green Building November Luncheon: Graywater Treatment and Planning

Water issues such as drought, infrastructure failure, and restrictions on use are things we have all gotten used to hearing but often don’t consider further. The truth is that globally our thirst for water is increasing at an alarming rate with no end in sight. The reality is that only 2.5% of the earth’s water is freshwater and half of that is tied up in glaciers and ice caps. Water reuse is a viable solution to the water issues facing us all. Understanding how to apply basic principles of water reuse planning and system application will ensure we have enough water for generations.

Speaker: Benjamin Sojka, Vice President of Design, Rainwater Management Solutions

Pre-approved for 1.0 GBCI and 1.0 AIA CE

When:
November 14, noon to 1:00pm (lunch provided)

Register for Lunch Here!

Where: 
City Space
100 5th Street, NE, Downtown Mall, Charlottesville, VA

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GVGBC Luncheon: Save the Bay!

watershedJoin us at City Space in downtown Charlottesville at noon on January 12th to learn more about what local organizations are doing to help reduce the amount of pollution in the Chesapeake Bay through credits for reducing stormwater runoff and education.

Please read more and register for the event at GVGBC.org

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River at Risk: The Environmental Health of the James River

River at Risk: The Environmental Health of the James River

Tuesday, January 13th,  2015  — 12:00-1:00 PM

Located at CitySpace, on the downtown mall in Charlottesville

james river

 

The GVGBC is pleased to welcome Pat Calvert, The Upper James River Keeper for the James River Association  who will present on the environmental threats to the James River.

The James River Association (JRA) is kicking off its “Our River at Risk” advocacy campaign throughout the James River basin to bring awareness to potential threats to the James River, a significant source of drinking water for Virginians.

Due to several recent incidents, to include the chemical spill on the Elk River in West Virginia, the coal ash spill on the Dan River in North Carolina and the train derailment and oil spill in Lynchburg, JRA has been researching the issues of crude-by-rail, toxic chemical storage and coal ash in the watershed.

Bill Street, Chief Executive Officer for the James River Association  says “Our River at Risk” is designed to inform and engage the public in a conversation about the ongoing threats to the James.

“The James River Association is calling on industry and government to recognize and address the risks that are facing the river in light of the recent toxic incidents in the region. JRA has identified important goals in regards to potential policies to address each issue of concern and is seeking to engage the broader community, government agencies and industry representatives in an effort to achieve the results that are needed to safeguard the James River.”

This luncheon will be held at City Space, 100 5th St. NE, on the Downtown Mall, Charlottesville, VA. Doors open at 11:45 and the Seminar begins at 12:00. Luncheons are open to the public.  Lunch is provided, attendance is free for GVGBC members and $10 for non members. Advance registration requested at GVGBC.ORG  

 

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Local Charlottesville Green Resource: Better World Betty

Better World Betty is a local grassroots organization dedicated to empowering people and business with the tools they need to be sustainable. They have really helpful information about how to recycle tricky items, find greener options, and make your everyday life more earth friendly. They also keep tabs on everything effecting the environment in the Charlottesville area and can answer any green questions that you may have!

bwb2

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Science Talk: Tropical Forests and Climate Change

Join us tomorrow night, June 12, 7:30 PM, at BLACK MARKET MOTO SALOON in charlottesville to hear all about the science of rain forests, part of Science Strait Up.

Description from Science Strait Up: “How are tropical forests and climate change linked?  U.Va. Environmental Sciences professor Deborah Lawrence discusses the long history of forest clearing and how it has affected the earth’s atmosphere over the past 8,000 years.  Forests are important for taking up carbon, but growth and productivity limit how much they can hold.  Come learn about the science behind tropical forests, carbon, and our atmosphere, and why it matters.”

tropical

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Green Building Material? Cross Laminated Timber

Here’s the idea, glue a bunch of small pieces of wood together from quickly growing trees and make yourself a massive chunk of wood. Make these chunks in to massive panels and design them so that they can be easily joined together in the field and super strong by alternating the direction of the grain.  It sounds a lot like plywood on steroids. This may seem against the tree-hugger in you, as well as going against the first R rule: Reduce. Actually this is a green technology, here’s why:

First of all, think about the building itself. Mass in a building helps to regulate the temperature of a building, much like a battery (or more technically accurate, a capacitor) it slowly gains heat from its surroundings and slowly releases it. Plenty of people have written about this already: Greenpassivesolar.com is just one. When you have massive walls you need less insulation to have the same effect. Bingo, less fiberglass or foams off-gassing into the building. Panels also take less time to put together in the field, so you spend less time with no roof and waste less material on the jobsite.

Second, think about the environment: Trees are some of the best carbon sequester-ers (I know that’s not a word) on the planet. By building something out of wood, one effectively stores that carbon. This principal is a green one only if the trees used are fast growing (rapidly renewable) and responsibly harvested. The building must also be built to be useful for a very long time.

Read more from europe here:

cross-laminated-timber (1)

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Design Tool: 2030 Palette

Architecture 2030 is a team of non-profit crusaders that want to radically transform the way that structures are built and how they interact with the environment. The 2030 Challenge is much like the EPA’s very successful CFC reduction program that let the Ozone Hole repair itself. Instead of CFCs, this challenge is to phase out the use of fossil fuels in buildings by the year 2030.

Not to leave everyone hanging wondering how to accomplish this goal; they are developing a great free resource of information on how to build carbon neutral and resilient structures and plan resilient communities which is called the 2030 Palette. The website is complete with pictures, descriptions and rules of thumb for many concepts vital to low impact built environments. Check out this fantastic tool for Architects, Engineers, Owners and people who want to learn more about how our buildings interact with the environment.

sol_y_sombra_2

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